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Preliminary program



Major themes

(3 one-day sessions)

  1. The Fall of Empires
    Organisateur:
  2. The City as Culture
    Organisateur:
  3. Religion and Power
    Organisateur:

Specialised themes

(21 half-day sessions)

  1. Biography and Microhistory
    Organisateur:
  2. Conquests and Demography
    Organisateur:
  3. Who Owns History? Sources Past and Present
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  4. Colonial Empires in Africa and Cultural Hybridity
    Organisateur:
  5. The Changing Culture of Travel
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  6. Emigrants and Immigrants
    Organisateur:
  7. Free and Unfree Labour in Modern Times
    Organisateur:
  8. The Book in a Trans-cultural Perspective
    Organisateur:
  9. Nation-building in the 20th Century Islamic World
    Organisateur:
  10. Consumer Society and Economic Change
    Organisateur:
  11. "We are what we eat and what we wear." Food and Clothing in History
    Organisateur:
  12. Social History of Credit
    Organisateur:
    Description Ouvrir
    Description Cacher
    For economic historians the key question about financial institutions is how they connect to economic growth. Even though this is a question firmly rooted in the economic domain, studying the social aspects of credit operations may increase our understanding of this causal connection. This session will explore three questions, two substantial, one methodological. First of all we will consider the geographical spread of financial institutions. To what extent does the location of borrowers and lenders determine their access to financial markets? Second, we explore the use borrowers and lenders made of personal relations and professional intermediaries to supply information about supply and demand on credit markets? Do personal relations become less important when markets grow bigger, or do specialized intermediaries in these larger markets still rely on social networks to match borrowers and lenders? The session will compare the history of credit markets in various parts of Europe through contributions that employ a vast array of different qualitative and quantitative sources. We will try to build on this diversity to explore which sources lend itself to a comparative analysis of credit markets between countries.

  13. National Identity and Hegemonic Memory
    Organisateur:
    Description Ouvrir
    Description Cacher
    It is a remarkable phenomenon that since the 1980's it has become impossible to problematize history without going into its complex relationship with 'collective memory' at the same time. The remarkable success of Pierre Nora's idea of 'lieux de memoire' - also as an export-product, replicated in many other national contexts
    - is only one its symptoms. Parallel with the 'memory-boom', an 'identity-boom' can be observed, questioning history's traditional close allegiance to and focus on 'national identity'. The question 'Whose memory parades as national history anyway?' - and thus the question of hegemony in matters of history and of national identity - has been on the historians agenda ever since.

    Conflicts as to national history's 'appropriate' contents have been rampant, manifesting themselves in 'history wars' and in subsequent calls to codify the nations historical 'canon'. Simultaneously, in many nations 'the empire' has 'struck back' by questioning the nation's relationship with - and its dependency on - its former colonial empire. The call for the 'globalization' of history is just one of the attempts to clarify the present fuzzy condition of national history by 'provincializing Europe' and by reframing its national histories in terms of hegemonical memory.

    This specialized theme will take stock of the questions outlined above for a variety of nations in various corners of this world. It thus will analyze the unity and diversity in the issue of national identity and hegemonic memory from a global perspective.

    The organizer, Chris Lorenz, is one of the leaders of a Europe wide comparative research project on national history writing in the 19th. and 20th. century.
    (see: www.uni-leipzig.de/zhsesf/). He is also a Bureau-member of the 'International Commission of Historiography and Theory of Historiography' and a chair of the Network 'Theory and Historiography' of the 'European Social Science History Conference' since 1994.
    With Stefan Berger he is the editor of 'The Contested Nation. Ethnicity, Religion, Class and Gender in National Histories', publishd in 2008 with Palgrave MacMillan. Further he has published widely on issues of history and identity and on comparative historiography. His book 'Constructing the Past'(published in Dutch and in German) is now being translated into English and into Chinese.
  14. Frontiers and Boundaries
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    Description Ouvrir
    Description Cacher
    Border studies are considered to be one of the most important paradigm shifts made since the 1990s. The studies provide a new inspiring conceptual framework that enables scholars to go beyond the nation-state paradigm and to deal with its relevant issues of collective identity and loyalty in the interdisciplinary subjects of cultural studies, ethnology, anthropology, geopolitics, and postcolonial studies, etc.
    It seems to be the case, however, that historiography fails to stay abreast of academic developments achieved in this new field of border studies, despite newly heated discussions that have led to the studies of 'transnational history,' 'histoire croisée/entangled history,' and 'global history.' Historical writings in most countries still remain restricted to the conventional framework of national history and away from the new revelations and the innovative thinking in historical methodology.
    Border history paradigm holds significance, among other things, as available alternatives to the national history of individual countries. The new approach draws attention away from the concept of supposedly 'unmovable or fixed' borders within the individual nation state paradigm. Instead, it presents an alternative concept of 'movable and changing' borders, the space in which cultural exchanges constantly happened and yielded resultant hybrids. The upshot is the emergence of a history that can go beyond the restrictions of the nation state's borders.
    The border history will be able to provide a new understanding of history, a historical-epistemic base upon which it will lead to the overcoming of traditional nation-state conflicts and promote peaceful co-existence. Transnational perspectives of border history can break through the academic border of historians and civil societies that remains locked in the national history paradigm. As long as the national history paradigm goes on, it will be realistically impossible to find reasonable and acceptable solutions to the current controversies regarding historic communities that had once been located within the present borders, or conflicts over the issue of national sovereignty over border areas.
    In this sense, the new approach to border history can serve as a stepping stone for historians to do away with the practice of unearthing selective evidence that proves advantageous to 'their national interests' and to work toward interpreting them from the new perspective of border history. Only then, will the common past be able to turn into a shared basis for building future peace for the sake of all mankind. This is the very purport for which this session is organized.
    But this session won’t be confined to case studies of East Asia. The border question in the historiography has been interrelated with the emerging nation state on the world scale and, thus the national history as an apologia for the nation state. The cultural transfer or interaction of the nation state as a module stays behind the scene of historical conflicts over the national territory, which demands a global history approach. This session will shed a comparative and insightful light on the issue of border history synchronically between the regions of East Asia, Europe, Africa and America, and diachronically between modern and pre-modern era.


  15. History and Human Rights
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  16. Sexual Violence : History, Cultures and Representations
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  17. New Republics : Nation-building in 19th Century Latin America
    Organisateur:
    Description Ouvrir
    Description Cacher
    The purpose of this session is to discuss the formation of the Latin American republics. At the beginning of the 19th century, the collapse of the colonial order as a result of the Spanish and Portuguese imperial crises triggered deep political changes in the territories formerly under Iberian domain. In the case of Spanish America, the dissolution of the bonds that had held the different parts of the empire together inaugurated a long and contested process of political experimentation. Attempts at forming new polities followed different directions, and the political map changed many times during the post-revolutionary decades. Only by end of the nineteenth century a relatively stable pattern of nation-states consolidated, but no linear or predetermined path had led to that outcome.

    Despite these complexities, the polities in the making, the short- and the long-lived alike, all adopted republican forms of government based on the principle of popular sovereignty. There was no single republican model, and the label applies to a wide variety of endeavors. But all of them entailed a radical change in the principles of legitimization of political power. Once the Spanish monarchy fell and the empire collapsed, two main problems arose: how to reconstruct a political order on the basis of popular sovereignty, and how to shape the new polities (“nations”), which were to be the sources of that sovereign power as well as the domains for its application. Thus, all attempts at nation building –the successful but also the unsuccessful ones, which were many more- were at the same time essays in political innovation. To devise the nation was at the same time to design, set in motion, and sustain political institutions.

    Brazil had a rather different trajectory. Established after independence from Portugal as a constitutional monarchy, it remained a relatively unified polity under a single rule, and became a republic in 1889. Throughout the nineteenth century, the new nation experienced important political innovations, which are comparable to those undertaken in the Spanish American polities.

    This session will focus, therefore, on the long-term political changes inaugurated by the revolutions of independence and the following attempts at nation-building mainly within republican frameworks. The six selected papers will explore different dimensions of those changes in specific cases.

  18. Higher Learning in Islam, Judaism and Christianity
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    Description Ouvrir
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    Description and Some Proposed Issues for Specialized Section 18 “Higher Education in Moslem, Jewish and Christian Societies”

    The purpose of this session is to examine in a comparative perspective the nature of Higher Learning in Islamic, Jewish and Christian societies, in the pre-modern and modern periods. Hence, papers, while they can be based on specific case studies, should aim at broader issues which can be discussed comparatively. Synthetic surveys will also be welcome. Among key questions which it is worthwhile to address are:
    1) The role of the religious tradition and/or religious authorities in forming the content of higher learning.
    2) The “image of knowledge” informing higher learning: traditional and closed or more open-ended and oriented towards innovation, discovery and the advancement of knowledge. Are such dichotomies applicable at all?
    3) The relations between higher learning and political authority.
    4) Teaching techniques and skills (like the European “disputatio” in medieval and the early modern period, or the “Pilpul” in Jewish traditional Rabbinical schools).
    5) The relations between teachers and students, whether “authoritarian” or more “egalitarian”.
    6) The social matrix of higher learning. Which groups in society are participating and to which strata of the population higher learning is aimed at.
    7) Attitudes towards the “other” – towards alien traditions, religions, cultures, minority groups.
  19. Religion and Society in Premodern South and South East Asia
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  20. Towards a World History? Social Policies and Politics in a Globalised World
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  21. Emotions as Historical Factor : Perceptions and Feelings in the Ancient World
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Round tables

(14 half-day sessions)

  1. Slavery : The State of the Question
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  2. History and Ethics
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  3. Tolerance Before the 18th Century
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  4. Conflicting Memories of Colonization
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  5. Astronomy and Astrology in Antiquity and the Middle Ages
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  6. Imago Mundi : Mapping the World
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  7. Is There a Global Approach to History?
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  8. See: Specialized Theme 21
  9. The Rights of the Dead
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  10. The Public Sphere : the Uses of a Concept
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  11. Urban Violence, Casual and Extraordinary
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  12. Ethnic Diversity, Cultural Exchanges and Identity in Ancient and Medieval Societies
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  13. The Confrontation of Oral and Written Cultures
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  14. Female Iconic Representations of Collective Identity
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  15. Women and Learned Culture
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Joint sessions

(10 half-day sessions)

  1. Gender and Education
    Organismes: International Standing Conference for the History of Education / Commission internationale pour l'histoire des Universités.
    Organisateur:
  2. City, Knowledge and Communication
    Organismes: Commission internationale pour l'histoire des villes / Comité national de Belgique
    Organisateur:
    Description Ouvrir
    Description Cacher
    Joined Session sponsored by the International Commission for the History of Towns and the Belgian National Committee at the CISH conference, Amsterdam 2010


    Knowledge is the lynchpin of the modern world system, the key to competitiveness in economy, ideology and understanding, and an important moral force. Over half the world's inhabitants now dwell in cities and towns, which since their origins more than 5,000 years ago have played a powerful role in generating and transmitting knowledge, information, new ideas, languages and religions, and in consolidating those notions in nations and states. Communication within and between cities, and between cities and the territories with which they interact, has shaped, and continues to shape, the ways in which knowledge is both constructed and received. In this process, despite developments in urban scale, institutions, infrastructures and technologies, there is a continuum from the smallest permanent settlement – the smallest town in its rural setting – to the modern megalopolis, which attracts people, commodities and ideas from throughout the world. The networking and exchange which has characterised this process is today more extensive and more intensive than ever before and occupies new forms of physical, if not mental, space. New media of communication are being employed and perhaps new types of knowledge – certainly new ways of transmitting it – are becoming ever more influential in shaping new patterns of everyday life. Yet these new forms grow out of, and are still heavily conditioned by, long-established urban institutions and practices, which accommodate and facilitate networks of communication involving individuals, firms, governments and religions.

    Knowledge and communication are historically rooted in specific sites: cities, ports, market places, places of worship, courts, universities, shops, clubs, coffee houses, parliaments, refuges, blogs, discussion rooms, and many more. Technology and speed of communication affect these forms and the social practices which sustain them. The medium has become, if not the message, then the structure of the perceived world, shaped by roads, railways, shipping routes, the telephone and the internet. As the same time many of the traditional problems persist. How can the increasing quantity and speed of communication be accommodated without physical congestion and ‘information overload’? How can the modes of communication be maintained, improved, policed and kept secure? How can we assess, the quality and value of the goods, information or ideas received? What forms of communication are sustainable over the long term?
    .
    The International Commission for the History of Towns has initiated a research programme on 'Towns and communication' which will serve as a starting point for the discussion of the many interlinked elements in this session. They range, at both local and global levels, from definitions of knowledge or cities themselves; to the language of communication, whether oral, textual, music, drama, and dance; to the forms of communication, whether personal, institutional, political or economic; to technologies of communication and transport and their influence, intentional or otherwise, on cities and the wider networks of experience, perception and exchange.
  3. Humanism in History
    Organismes: International Commission for the History and Theory of Historiography / Verband der Historiker und Historikerinnen Deutschlands
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  4. Political History of Historiography
    Organismes: Société suisse d'histoire / Giunta Centrale per gli Studi Storici
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  5. Images, Mass Media and History
    Organismes: International Commission for the History and Theory of Historiography / Japan National Committee / International Standing Conference for the History of Education / Commission Internationale pour l'histoire des universités / Société internationale pour la didactique de l'histoire
    Organisateur:
  6. National Histories and the Globalization of History
    Organismes: International Standing Conference for the History of Education / Commission Internationale pour l'histoire des universités / Société internationale pour la didactique de l'histoire
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  7. Small Countries as Models for Innovative Politics
    Organismes: Koninklijk Nederlands Historisch Genootschap / Amsterdam Congress Organizing Committee
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  8. International Relations in Sport : Historiographical Trends and New Challenges
    Organismes: Commission internationale pour l'histoire des relations internationales / Société internationale d'histoire de l'éducation physique et du sport
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  9. The Concept of Space in Modern History
    Organismes: International Standing Conference for the History of Education / Société internationale pour la didactique de l'histoire
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    Description Ouvrir
    Description Cacher
    The Construction of Transnational Educational Spaces

    Eckhardt Fuchs (University of Mannheim)

    In the recent decade historical scholarship has undergone a paradigmatic transformation. New cultural and social history concepts have been looking closer at processes of translocal and transregional processes and entanglements, studying topics such as migration, trade, culture, and environment. Such transnational or global approaches attempt to go beyond the real and imagined boundaries of nation-states by applying new theoretical concepts and methodologies. Besides these new historical approaches, social science studies on world-wide networks have made visible the global expansion of education systems in the course of the past centuries. These empirical neo-institutional studies have convincingly illustrated the emergence of a world culture that was founded upon a global “grammar of education” and was mainly fostered by international agents.

    These developments in historical and sociological research have raised the interest in transnational and global processes within the field of education. Issues and methods that were confined to global historians and social scientists, namely transnational and transcultural relations, global and multi-polar perspectives, spatial extension, diffusion, and migration, have increasingly attracted historians of education and have created new innovative research areas, such as translocal exchanges characterized by adaptation, recontextualization, and hybridization; educational migration; the role of indigenous education; the denationalization and redefinition of territorial boundaries through network analysis; and the interplay of national and international education models, which is reproduced and changed by the ongoing dynamics between both levels. However, there is still a lack of empirical studies that examine the specific historical contexts, regional variations, and agents of the global rise of education over the past three centuries and also that investigate the construction and transformation of transnational educational spaces.

    The proposed Special Section takes up these latest developments in historical and social science research by exploring the construction of transnational spaces and the role of transnational agents within the perspective of the global rise of education. Presenting various empirical studies, it will in particular focus on the two interrelated concepts: transnational spaces and networks as transnational agents. While the former is devoted to the effects of transfers and diffusion in specific national and regional spheres and analyses the construction of spaces through social interaction, language, or symbolic practices, the latter investigates networks as those agents of the global process that create these new spaces. Such a network approach helps to draw a micro-perspective picture that envisages those specific circumstances, variations, actors, and mechanics of phenomena from a cultural angle that macro-sociological theories on the world-wide development of education describe as global processes of standardization and homogenization. It also reinterprets assumptions of a nation-centered historiography on educational reform and focuses on the interactions of agents that have not yet been an object in the history of education but have so greatly influenced educational developments on the local, national, and international levels.
  10. Trade and Civilization from Ancient Times to Present
    Organismes: International Association for Economic History / Korean National Committee / Comité national des historiens de la république tchèque
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Special sessions

(4 half-day sessions)

  1. The History of UNESCO Project
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  2. Ethics, Historical Research and Law
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  3. The Modernization of China, India and Japan : a Comparative Study
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    Description Ouvrir
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    China, India and Japan have been the three biggest economies in Asia. The GDP of the three countries combined accounted for one fifth of the world’s total in 2008 (17.6% in official exchange rate or 21.7% in PPP) and the share is expected to increase remarkably in the near future. The rise of the three countries to a position of wealth and power is one of the major forces shaping the international economic and political system in the latter half of the twentieth century and there is no doubt that the three countries will play a much bigger role in the world in the twenty first century world.

    The recent economic performances of China, India and Japan represent a new stage of the long processes of modernization of the three countries which can be traced from centuries ago. These processes are different not only from those of the Western countries, but also between the three countries themselves. These differences have molded the special paths of modernization of the three countries. Therefore, a comparative study of the history of modernization of f China, India and Japan will be very helpful to our knowledge of the present of the three countries.

    The discussion of this session will focus on the early stages of economic modernization of the three countries, in particular on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, since the major shaping forces of modern China, India and Japan still work today. We will identify the variants between the three countries which are not necessarily associated with a particular degree of backwardness, and the elements which are modern strengths, which provided a base for economic modernization of the countries in the second half of the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries.

    In this session, scholars from China, India, Japan, the USA and other countries will discuss the issues of agriculture, rural industry, productivity, market, monetary company law, social policy, and so on. The session will bring historians from different countries and in different fields together and have a full communication to exchange ideas. We hope that it will promote our understanding of history not only of the three countries, but of the world, since near 40% of the world population live in these countries.
  4. World Images in Historical Perspective
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Affiliated international organizations

  1. Association Internationale d’Étude du Sud-Est Européen
    1. South East Europe and Asia
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      A survey of the relationship between the Balkan and Carpatho-Danubian regions with the different parts of Asian continent (Minor Asia, Near East, India, the Chinese-Japanese and Siberian areas) from prehistory to present day.
  2. Association Internationale d’Histoire Contemporaine de l’Europe
    1. Formation and decomposition of European states
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      Les trois séances seront consacrées: une aux considérations autour de la question “Etat et Nation”, et deux autres autour de deux grands empires: celui des Habsbourg et russe/soviétique. Le programme est déjà en grande partie fixé – vous trouverez ci-dessous la liste des contributions avec les noms des auteurs qui se sont déclarés. Les dernières précisions doivent arriver bientôt.
    2. State and Nation
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      La première séance du colloque „La formation et la décomposition des Etats européens au XXe siècle“ sera consacrée à l’analyse de la réalisation pratique, au XXe siècle, du concept de l’Etat-nation, surtout dans les solutions qui furent élaborées à l’issue de la Première et de la Deuxième guerres mondiales, ainsi qu’au début de l’étape qualitativement nouvelle que fut la construction européenne.
    3. Habsburg Empire and afterwards
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      La démarche de la deuxième séance du colloque „La formation et la décomposition des Etats européens au XXe siècle“ est d’analyser le mécanisme (inévitable?) de la décomposition de l’Empire des Habsbourg, ensuite les parcours des différents Etats nés en conséquence de celle-ci. L’idée est de mettre en relief les déterminantes spécifiques pour chaque cas qui ont conduit aux événements complexes et souvent dramatiques marquant l’histoire de l’Europe Centrale au XXe siècle.
    4. The Great Eastern Empire
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      La troisième séance du colloque „La formation et la décomposition des Etats européens au XXe siècle“ doit comprendre deux volets. L’un sera consacré l’analyse de la formation et de la chute de l’Empire soviétique, deux événements qui ont profondément marqué le XXe siècle. L’autre portera sur la confrontation entre cet Empire de type nouveau et certaines réalisations de l’idée de l’Etat-nation.
  3. Association Internationale d’Histoire Économique
    1. Global Inequality in the Long Run – New Evidence and New Measurement Concepts
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      How did inequality around the globe develop in the long run? How can we measure various aspects of inequality? This session firstly draws together new evidence on income inequality, especially in today’s developing and emerging market countries and world regions, such as Latin America, Asia, and Africa. It secondly aims at comparing classical income inequality concepts with other approaches of measuring inequality, such as height inequality, human capital inequality, and the systematic comparison of real wage per GDP/p with gini coefficients of income inequality. Third, and on the basis of these new evidence and concepts, the session aims to promote the analysis of global inequality trends. Doing this, a fascinating new picture of global divergence and convergence movements is drawn.
  4. Comité International d’Histoire de la Seconde Guerre mondiale
    1. The experience of occupation, 1931-1949. Comparative Perspectives on the Asian and European Theatres of War.
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      The events leading to and arising from the Second World War, both in its European and Pacific theaters, span two decades. Fascist and imperial projects of territorial expansion and colonial domination, the exportation of political and ideological models, the reconstruction of defeated nations under the supervision of their victors, took various forms, with different levels of constraints and violence inflicted. Occupation of vast territories and areas, and even of entire nations by foreign armies and civilian authorities has been, a central constellation of the international order of the 1930s and 1940s. To a greater extent even than during and after the First World War, the post-Second World War order was determined by experiences shaped by foreign occupation: ideological commitments and affiliations, economic exploitation, social and cultural deprivation, population displacement, and resistance. Occupation delegitimated certain political regimes and vindicated others, thereby conditioning the emergence of new nation states: the independence of former colonies, the adoption of post-fascist regimes by a communist or liberal-parliamentarian system of government, and the exacerbation of national and ethnic conflicts. A common discussion on the nature and impact of the experience of occupation therefore addresses the central ambition of the International Committee for the History of the Second World War to encourage the study of these events in their widest chronological and geographical contexts.

      The conference will focus on three main themes:

      • Occupation: its definition, nature in different war zones and status in international law.

      • The impact of occupation on civilians population

      • The impact of occupation on the legitimacy of former political authorities, national and resistance movements.

      In each of the panels, the organisers encourage comparisons between the European, Atlantic and the Pacific theaters of war.
  5. Commission Internationale d’Histoire de la Révolution française
    1. The French Revolution in transnational perspective I
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      In this colloquium we aim to discuss the impact and outreach of the Revolution beyond the boundaries of France, and to evaluate the nature of the links that were forged between France and the wider world, between Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia, both at the time of the French Revolution itself and in a longer-term perspective – in the new states of Central and South America in the wars of independence of the nineteenth century, for instance, or in China during the nationalist and communist revolutions of the twentieth. Whether for other European nations during the early years of the nineteenth century or, more recently, for peoples across the globe seeking to free themselves from European colonialism, the French Revolution has become a critical point of reference, a template for popular politics and nation-building. As such it has come to have a world-wide resonance which has largely survived the implosion of the Soviet Union in 1989 and which remains intact after more than two centuries.

      The colloquium will contribute to the current concern among historians to look at social, political and cultural issues in their transnational context rather than to see them purely within the confines of a single country.
    2. The French Revolution in transnational perspective II
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      In this colloquium we aim to discuss the impact and outreach of the Revolution beyond the boundaries of France, and to evaluate the nature of the links that were forged between France and the wider world, between Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia, both at the time of the French Revolution itself and in a longer-term perspective – in the new states of Central and South America in the wars of independence of the nineteenth century, for instance, or in China during the nationalist and communist revolutions of the twentieth. Whether for other European nations during the early years of the nineteenth century or, more recently, for peoples across the globe seeking to free themselves from European colonialism, the French Revolution has become a critical point of reference, a template for popular politics and nation-building. As such it has come to have a world-wide resonance which has largely survived the implosion of the Soviet Union in 1989 and which remains intact after more than two centuries.

      The colloquium will contribute to the current concern among historians to look at social, political and cultural issues in their transnational context rather than to see them purely within the confines of a single country.
    3. The French Revolution in transnational perspective III
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      Description Ouvrir
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      In this colloquium we aim to discuss the impact and outreach of the Revolution beyond the boundaries of France, and to evaluate the nature of the links that were forged between France and the wider world, between Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia, both at the time of the French Revolution itself and in a longer-term perspective – in the new states of Central and South America in the wars of independence of the nineteenth century, for instance, or in China during the nationalist and communist revolutions of the twentieth. Whether for other European nations during the early years of the nineteenth century or, more recently, for peoples across the globe seeking to free themselves from European colonialism, the French Revolution has become a critical point of reference, a template for popular politics and nation-building. As such it has come to have a world-wide resonance which has largely survived the implosion of the Soviet Union in 1989 and which remains intact after more than two centuries.

      The colloquium will contribute to the current concern among historians to look at social, political and cultural issues in their transnational context rather than to see them purely within the confines of a single country.
  6. Commission Internationale d’Histoire des Relations Internationales
    1. Great Migrations and the History of International Relations
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      Migrations represent a foundamental factor in the history of mankind. In recent times they became a major issue for the States and its relations. The session intends to analyze this topic with a historical perspective.
    2. International Relations History and Cultural Studies
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      In the last decades the history of international relations has expanded
      its methodological instrument and has entered into fruitful exchange
      under the "cultural turn". This multi-faceted development has enriched
      traditional "diplomatic history". The session will focus in an exemplary
      way to some of the developments, e.g. the impact of rites, symbols,
      images, performances and memories.
    3. General Assembly of CHIR
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      General Assembly of the associates
  7. Commission Internationale d’Histoire et d'Étude du Christianisme
    1. Changing Concepts of Sainthood and the Holy Life
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      This session will examine changing concepts of holy living across time and place and within a variety of religious traditions, including those that have no formal criteria for sainthood.
    2. Christian Churches and Communism
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      This session will examine the relationship at both a practical and a theoretical level, highlighting especially the situation in central and eastern Europe c.1945-91.
    3. Dealing with the Religious Past
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      Many times in its history Christianity has been re-invented as radical social and political changes rendered past experiences, rituals and doctrines irrelevant. We are now in another such period of drastic change and this session will examine the ways in which Christians confronted crises of comparable dimensions in earlier times.
  8. Commission Internationale d’Histoire Maritime
    1. Early-modern maritime worlds
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      Part One (3 papers) - Scottish Networks in the Early-Modern Atlantic.
      Networks are now a popular theme in many areas of history. This is especially true of the early-modern Atlantic. Historians often centre their networks around the ‘centre’ or ‘metropole’, or around the network actor central to their story. Using ‘Scottish’ networks these three papers aim to complicate this paradigm.

      Part Two (3 papers) - Early-Modern legal and popular attitudes to "piracy".
      The papers will all address the relationship between economic realities/structures and the notion of violence as a social and cultural construct, all within the confines of the maritime environment.
    2. People, place and mobility
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      Part One (3 papers)- Sailors ashore
      These papers offer unfamiliar perspectives on the lives of merchant mariners. While much of the historiography of maritime labour concentrates on working and living conditions at sea, this session focuses on the time mariners spent away from their ships, and their interaction with seaport space, society and culture, from the late eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth. The session analyses aspects of the ‘sailortown’ phenomenon, which has long been central to the representation of seaport cities, but also considers less sensationalised engagements between mariners and seaport culture. Many maritime workers had established households in or near their home ports, a trend that developed rapidly in the steamship era, while sailortown itself was a more complex urban theatre than its stereotypes allow. Taken together, these papers demonstrate the range and potential of new research at the boundaries between maritime, labour and urban history.

      Part Two (3 papers) - The Business of Emigration.
      In the last quarter of the 19th century, and the early part of the 20th, European emigration to North America dominated the transatlantic trades, with shipping companies across Europe competing for the lucrative business of emigrant traffic. These three papers bring together considerations which influenced the individual emigrant’s choices, from their port of departure, which shipping company they chose, to their place of destination. The papers consider forces of business in both peace and war-time.
    3. Maritime research: Resources and applications
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      Part One (3 papers) - Museums and Research. These three papers bring museum practitioners from across Europe to discuss the possibilities, opportunities and value of developing collaborative research partnerships in order to enrich museum collections knowledge.

      Part Two - (3 papers) - Open Session. This open session looks at the application of maritime research and resources used. The variety of source material, both in the form of archival resources, but also material evidence and culture are critical to enhancing our understanding of maritime worlds. The analysis and potential application of this information, through the development of databse technology, increases the opportunities to exploit information in a variety of ways.
    4. Trade, shipping and maritime networks
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      This session brings together current thinking and research on global trade, shipping and networks from the early-modern period to the twentieth century.
  9. Commission Internationale d’Histoire Militaire Comparée
    1. Military History : Current Trends and Perspectives
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      Organisée par la Commission internationale d’histoire militaire comparée, cette Table ronde vise à donner un aperçu des tendances récentes de l’histoire militaire, entendue dans son sens le plus large : histoire des armées et des guerres ; relations entre les armées, la guerre et les sociétés civiles ; etc. Quatre ou cinq orateurs issus de plusieurs continents y présenteront l’état de la question et les perspectives de recherche dans leur aire géographique et/ou linguistique.
    2. Medieval Medicine in Castillian Literature
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      The subject is to analise the use of medicine in medieval Castilian Literature.
  10. Commission Internationale de Démographie Historique
    1. Reassessing historical demography: where we are and where we are going
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      As we approach the 2010 meeting of the International Congress of Historical Sciences in Amsterdam, the Commission for Historical Demography calls for a reassessment of our field. As historians, we believe that historical demography has promoted great advances in our discipline’s contribution to the understanding of the human condition. Our colleagues now benefit from enhanced explanations of birth, marriage, and death based on quantitative procedures grounded in closely analyzed data. These advances, indeed, provide the underpinnings for comparative approaches to the history of parts of the world widely separated in location and in time. Not only do we need to inform our colleagues of advances in our field, but we need to develop new approaches which build on existing strengths.
    2. Micro-data: Making Large and Complex Data Bases Easy to Use
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      The historical community is now fortunate to have a growing number of large-scale, public databases of life histories from the past. Some of these databases have been under development for a long time, such as the Demographic Database in Umeå, the Utah genealogical database, the Scania database in Lund and the PRDH and BALSAC in Quebec. Others are relatively recent, such as the Historical Sample of the Netherlands.
      Although many of these databases are intended to be public resources and available to any qualified researcher, relatively little work has been conducted with them. Since longitudinal databases are exceptionally rich and address a host of questions not covered by cross-sectional data, the difference is striking. One of the reasons for this relatively low use is the enormous complexity of this kind of data.
      The main object of this session is to present ways of making this kind of databases more easy to use, especially for those scholars in the historical and social sciences who have no or few experience in programming. Especially papers on new ways of data retrieval, documentation and data integration are welcome
    3. Intergenerational aspects of demography
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      Exploring intergenerational aspects of demography in history is the theme of this session. The world of historical demography has gained a lot from working with individual micro data. An important prerequisite for this has been the creation of large population databases based on different sets of population registers. During recent decades, life course analysis on continuous life biographies has developed. Demographic patterns and behavior across generations have however rarely been analyzed within historical demography. Data for such studies are usually unavailable. In the last years, interest in this perspective has however increased, partly because it has been made possible by newly created data sources. We now have databases that allow us to study families over several generations, which open up for several interesting questions. For example, do we find similar patterns of reproductive behavior or health and longevity between generations? Was high mortality or high fertility concentrated to certain families? What do we know about how these patterns were transferred? This session intend to bring together some of the research within this field.
      Intergenerational aspects have traditionally been developed within the field of genetics, identifying hereditary traits in human populations. It is however possible to study intergenerational aspects from other perspectives. Demographic patterns can be transferred within families through internalization of behavior. Other characteristics could be transferred over generations. The changing conditions for transfer are also of interest. In what circumstances did the transfer change, leading to different patterns in different generations?The session will primarily be focusing on the following issues, but is open also for other aspects:

      • Methodological and theoretical aspects of intergenerational studies
      • Reproductive behavior (fertility, marriage patterns)
      • Mortality, health, longevity, heights
      • Social and educational transmission of behavior.
    4. Demography of indigenous populations
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      The demographic history of indigenous populations is often different from the colonizers and the majority society they live in today. The present session aims to problematize the general demographic development among different indigenous peoples, including aspects of mortality, fertility, nuptiality and migration. The health transition is of special interest, and it is a great challenge for research to present analyses that combine quantitative methods with quality perspectives, such as culture, traditional knowledge and post-colonial theory. Comparative studies have high priority.
    5. The Effects of Migration on Demographic Indicators
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      The standard demographic indicators for fertility, mortality and nuptiality can be greatly distorted in highly mobile populations or populations that contain many immigrants. There may be no information regarding the past histories of migrants, making even the basic determination of marital status as ever or never married difficult and this difficulty affects the ability to calculate mean ages at mariage or other standard nuptiality rates. High mobility in populations where adoption, fosterage, child labor, or child abandonment were common also complicate the estimates of fertility. Even calculation of child-woman ratios may be affected since there may be no information regarding former births for migrant women who may have left small children behind or given them to families outside the population under observation. Migration also acts as a competing risk with mortality. Moreover, the officials compiling population registers may be more interested in the de facto population than why individuals are no longer present in the population. In such cases, individuals may be removed from or drop off the record without any indication as to whether the individual had moved or died. This circumstance has the potential to distort the calculation of mortality one way or another depending on the interpretation of the unknown exits from the data. What methods have been developed to deal with these problems? How can we work around the problems presented by highly mobile populations?
      At the same time, the fact of mobility may directly affect the demographic practice of migrants. The marriage market could be segmented, limiting and reducing the chance to marry. Migration could also make marriages unstable and more prone to divorce. Migrants may show different fertility levels than stable or core populations and migrants may be more vulnerable than natives. At the same time, migrants may represent the healthiest members of a population as the most capable of migrating.
      So, the effect of migration upon demographic indicators can be addressed from two main directions. One is a methodological question addressing how the lack of information on migrants may complicate or distort the estimation and calculation of demographic rates. The second addresses the demographic behavior of migrants and how the choice to migrate could select people with particular demographic characteristics. I would like to suggest two panels; one addressing the methodological concern and one addressing demographic behavior.
    6. Family, demography and well-being: historical perspectives on Eastern Europe
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      In contrary to Western Europe, the European East has usually been portrayed as the area par excellence of large and complex households. These supposed differences have been either attributed to more “collectivist” character of the Slavic populations, or were treated as arising from peasants’ survival strategies within the coercive system of serfdom. Such an East-West polarized distinction of family patterns in Europe is a cornerstone of a more general package of ideas, which posits links between the assumed peculiarity of the Eastern European family system and a high-pressure demographic environment of excessive fertility and high mortality, poverty, persistence of anti-modern values, unequal well-being (including constrained female autonomy), and other obstacles to the penetration of capitalism and its individualistic set of values. The aim of this session is to make a first step towards dismantling critically this package of ideas through the investigation of the links between family (e.g. household structure; domestic and individual life cycles; childbearing patterns; fertility strategies), demographic regimes (patterns of marriage; demo-economic hardships; the effects of demographic transition), and people’s emotional, social and physical well-being, and their ability to function in the ordinary tasks of living in the Eastern European context.
      Since our intention is to open up a discussion of a rather undeveloped research area, papers are welcome which tackle the problem from various angles and perspectives (be it a historical-demographic, social-economic history or anthropological approaches), but in which particular attention is given to family and population issues broadly defined. The session’s geographical scope takes J. Hajnal’s division of Europe as the point of departure, and hence its main focus on the territories lying east of the “imaginary line” running from St. Petersburg to Trieste, so to include the Balkan area, historical Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Bohemia, Hungary, as well as the European part of Russia.
    7. Inheritance systems in comparative perspective
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      Many researchers specialized on the history of the family, economics, and migration (among other research fields) have been led to study inheritance systems as a way to explain household structures, property transmission practices, and individual equal or unequal treatment within propertied families, especially in areas of small agricultural ownership. This session intends to generate a broad, comparative discussion on the various inheritance practices, on the various types of household structures (with or without coresidence), and on the various ways individuals were treated to draw a larger picture of the different systems across Europe and other continents perhaps, and provide a broad, synthetic overview of all systems, and explain migration patterns.
    8. Are Family Systems only for Land Owning Families? The Usefulness of the Concept of “Family System”
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      The concept of family systems has been widely used, not only in Europe where the most common typology originated, but virtually in every corner of the world. It is thought that these systems, which refer essentially to household co residence and inheritance patterns, affected many other aspects of society. Thus it became essential to categorize each society unambiguously according to which type of system it exemplified. This session aims to evaluate the utility of the concept. Recently several scholars have shown a de facto resemblance between families in what were supposed to be nuclear family systems and stem family systems because in both the youngest child remained behind in the household with the elderly parents. Are these, then, really two different types of family systems? Since these types are based in inheritance patterns, did they apply to families with little or nothing to inherit? When families moved to urban areas, did they continue the same family system that was supposedly typical of the rural areas from which they came ? Was it inheritance or other factors, such as the care of the older generation, that brought these systems about and led to their continuation? Can we devise another set of types that might be more useful for non-agricultural settings or should we abandon typologies altogether?
    9. Queenship and Kinship: Royal women’s agency in family strategies (14th-20th centuries)
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      Queenship research has shown in the last twenty years that royal women were not passive pawns in the power games of men. They could play authoritative and decisive roles in religious, cultural, economic, and even political activities. In this session, we want to address specifically their agency in family strategies: as daughters, sisters, wives and mothers they acted as peacemakers or provoked wars; they educated their children and negotiated their marriages to build alliances; they managed property, supported religious houses, cared for the maintenance of the family’s memory and the commemoration of the dead; some of them even ruled in their own right or as regents and lieutenants for their male relatives. Papers on all these issues will be welcome, especially under a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective.
    10. Looking backward to better understand the future of Historical Demography
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      The creation in 1960 of an International Commission of Historical Demography (ICHD) within the International Committee for Historical Sciences (CISH), at its General Assembly in Stockholm, marked the birth of Historical Demography as a field of inquiry. The 21st International Congress of Historical Sciences in Amsterdam will allow historical demographers to celebrate the 50th anniversary of their discipline !
      During this conference, ICHD will organize a Round table "Reassessing historical demography: Where we are and where we are going” which reassesses our current direction. Major new directions in the field will be discussed.
      The present panel will aim present the life course of historical demography, its inventors and beginnings.
    11. General Assembly
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      Statutary General Assembly of the International Commission for Historical Demography/Assemblée Générale Statutaire de la Commission Internationale de Démographie Historique-Session 1: Rapports/Reports
    12. Statutary General Assembly of the International Commission for Historical Demography
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      Statutary General Assembly of the International Commission for Historical Demography/Assemblée Générale Statutaire de la Commission Internationale de Démographie Historique-Session 2: Planning and/et elections
  11. Commission Internationale des Études Historiques Slaves
    1. Austroslavism
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      The general program on "Austroslavism, Panslavism, Neoslavism and the Notion of Slavic Solidarity Today" is articulated into three panels of at least three papers each.
      The first panel on "Austroslavism" will analyse the birth, the development and the achievement of the programs concerning the idea of a possible reform of the Habsburg’s Empire from the early 19th to the 20th centuries, with particular regard to the pre-war period.
    2. Panslavism and Neoslavism
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      The general program on "Austroslavism, Panslavism, Neoslavism and the Notion of Slavic Solidarity Today" is articulated into three panels of at least three papers each.
      The second panel on "Panslavism and Neoslavism" will analyse the nucleus of the Slavic ideas developed in East-Central Europe during the last two centuries with particular regard to the Russian world between 19th and 20th centuries.
    3. Slavic Solidarity Today
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      The general program on "Austroslavism, Panslavism, Neoslavism and the Notion of Slavic Solidarity Today" is articulated into three panels of at least three papers each. The third panel on "The Notion of Slavic Solidarity Today" will analyse the development of this concept in the context of East-Central Europe during the last two centuries and will single out moments of particular relevance, as the experience of Poland during the 70s and the 80s of the 20th century. Finally it will be analysed the concept of Slavic Solidarity today, when the enlarged European Union and the general phenomenon of globalisation are rapidly changing the traditional historical and political perspectives.
  12. Commission Internationale pour l’Histoire des Assemblées d’État
    1. Parliaments, Estates & Representation: new problems and approaches
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      2 half-days
      One day of papers devoted to the history of parliamentary and representative institutions and to the methodology methodology of their study.

      . Models of Parliamentary practice

      2. The symbolism of Parliamentary ceremonies

      3. Parliamentary bureaucracies

      4. The archives and libraries of parliaments and estates

      5. Parliamentary rhetoric
    2. International Commission for the History of Representative & Parliamentary Institutions: Business Meeting and Open Forum
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      Statutory Business Meeting and Open Forum Discussion of Aims & Purposes
  13. Commission Internationale pour l’Histoire des Universités
    1. University and Scholarship I
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      University and Scholarship, included all social and intellectual aspects and also included scholarship outside the university, in so far there is a relationship with the university.
    2. University and Scholarship II
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      University and Scholarship, included all social and intellectual aspects and also included scholarship outside the university, in so far there is a relationship with the university
    3. University and Scholarship III
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      University and Scholarship, included all social and intellectual aspects and also included scholarship outside the university, in so far there is a relationship with the university.
  14. Commission Internationale pour l’Histoire des Villes
    1. General Assembly of the Commission for the History of Towns
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      assemblée annuelle statutaire
  15. Commission Internationale pour l’Histoire et la Théorie de l’Historiographie
    1. The Canon of Modern History: Construction, Dissemination, and Responses
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      During the past two centuries through various cultural encounters resulting from transnational movements related to colonialism, nationalism and imperialism, there developed a distinctive approach to writing history that was tied to the project of Modernity. The ways that the transplantation and/or the adoption of historicism as a new method for turning the past into History have been the subject of numerous studies. Most of these works, however, focused on the development of specific modes of thinking, researching and writing about the past, while neglecting to examine sufficiently how this tradition of history implicitly included a world view that placed Western Europe atop a hierarchy of nations and cultures. Embedded in modern historiography from its inception, was the idea that there was a single, linear developmental course of civilization in time, space and values. This perception, implicit or explicit in historiography, philosophy of history and social theory identified the concept of “civilization” as synonymous with the concept of “European civilization”. As a consequence, all other civilizations were conceived in negative terms as being debased, retrograde or evolutionary deviations from the correct developmental path. Modern historiography then, created not only a metanarrative that imposed the European experience as the true path of historical development but it also enshrined a specific way of ideology and methodology as the only way to write history, and together these became the “Canon” of Modern History.
      Although not always explicit, this canon of European or Western (in 20th c.) history created categories and concepts out of which the discourse of Modern History was constructed. European historians developed and deployed concepts, such as culture and civilization, nation, civil society, citizenship, public sphere, and others, as the foundation for writing the history of Europe and by so doing they enshrined them as the central props of the Canon. This had two consequences. First, it essentialized these concepts as universal elements of Modernity and, since Europe experienced Modernity first, it ensured that European history would be the yardstick against which all other nations would be measured. Second, when scholars and writers outside of Western Europe attempted to write their nations’ histories and adopted the Canon as the basis for doing so, they donned an intellectual straight-jacket that compelled them to narrate their nation’s story with a conceptual vocabulary drawn solely from the European experience. To do modern, scientific history, then, meant the adoption of a Canon that resulted invariably in the writing of histories of non-European nations that explained why they were inferior to Europe—even though the Canon itself was based on a very schematic, oversimplified image of Europe.
      The development of theories such as Orientalism, Subaltern and Postocolonial Studies has challenged the Canon and rendered it a subject for historian inquiry. The purpose of this panel will be, first, to examine the discourse among non-Western European historians regarding the Canon, including issues such as adoption, accommodation and resistance. Second, the panel will examine discourses alternative to the Canon that developed inside and outside of Western Europe. The panel contributes to an enhanced understanding of Modern historiography by examining it within the framework of the world production of history, but instead of exploring the dichotomies between asymmetrical historiographical paradigms it will focus on the internal tensions in the globalized writing of history.
    2. The Ebb and Flow of Marxist Historiography: A Global Perspective
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      To a great extent, the ebb and flow of the influence of Marxism has outlined the course of world history throughout of the 20th century. As an ideology and a methodology, Marxism has been and remains influential and instrumental in shaping the writing of history across the world. In the Western world the postmodern challenges to modern historiography from the 1970s bore apparent imprint of the Marxist influence. The Subaltern study, originating from but not confined in India, was also inspired considerably by Marxist historical theory and, to a lesser extent, by Maoist thinking. It has characterized the postcolonial critique of the accepted notion of modernity, delivering another formidable challenge to modern historiography. In addition, in such socialist or post-socialist countries as Russia, China and Vietnam, as well as non-socialist countries such as Japan, Marxism remains influential in historical writing and thinking.
      This panel will feature scholars across many parts of the world, discussing the varied influence of Marxism in historical writing in the postwar period. It will present case studies of North America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, East Asia and South Asia. The panel hopes to provide a venue for historians to explore and evaluate the relevance of Marxist historiography in the future development of historical writing worldwide.
    3. The Significance of history for politics and culture
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      Ever since Cicero’s historia magistra vitae historians and philosophers discussed the question of the relevance of historical knowledge for the present. In this session this question will mainly be addressed from the perspective of historical periodization. Point of departure is the proposal to recognize the years from the Fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 to the global financial crisis of 2008, as a historical period with a specific character of its own.
      When dealing with this question two types of issues will be discussed. Firstly, there are a some more theoretical problems, such as 1) what is the role of periodization in historical writing? Was Huizinga right when saying that all historical writing presupposes periodization?, 2) is periodization inevitably tainted by speculative philosophies of history and would it thus also invite the totalitairian politics of those systems?, 3) how are periods demarcated from each other(one should distinguish, for example, between ‘watersheds’, such as 476 or 1492 and ‘ruptures’, such as 1789 or 1989)?, 4) may the present be included in periodization (think of Fukuyama’s claim that 1989 marked the beginning of a new period, paradoxically labelled by him as ‘the end of history’, or the claim that 2008 saw already the end of that same period)?, or, 5) the reverse, is the present always implicitly part of our periodizations whether we like it or not (for example, 476 could acquire its meaning only with the Renaissance)?
      The second type of question is of a more historical and political character. One may think of questions, such as 1) is there an analogy between 1648 and 2008 since in both cases a period of univeralism (religion in the case of 1648 and the global financial system in the case of 2008) was replaced by a multipolar world?, 2) is there an illuminating parallel between feudalism and that global financial system insofar as in both little or no room was left for the notion of public interest?, 3) how should 2008 be located in the periodization proposed by Carl Schmitt in his The Concept of the Political (1927)?, 4) is a return of the political to be expected in the sense of Quentin Skinner’s republicanism?, and, if so, 5) is that an evolution to be welcomed or feared?
      Self-evidently, the answers to be given to these questions will differ if dealt with from a political philosophical, economical, or sociological perspective. But all- pervasive will always be the main issue: what are the historian’s responsibilities to her/his own time? Does s/he best serve her/his own time by carefully avoiding any reference to the present, or is it part of the historian’s assignment to discuss the meaning of the past for the present?

  16. International Association of Historical Societies for the Study of Jewish History (The)
    1. Jewish Social Space and Religious Culture in Medieval and Modern Islamic and Christian Societies, II
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      The second section will deal with the social and cultural significance of Jewish sacred places is Early Modern and Modern Eastern Europe and the Middle East

    2. Jewish Social Space and Religious Culture in Medieval and Modern Islamic and Christian Societies. I
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      The lectures of the first section will deal with religious and symbolic functions of Medieval and Early Modern Jewish institutions like the synagogue and the ritual bath, in Christian Europe.
  17. International Federation for Research in Women's History
    1. Unequal Sisters: Women, Gender, and Global Inequalities in Historical Perspective (1)
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      The aim of this session is to focus on and further explore women’s history from a global and non-Western perspective. We are looking for papers that deal with a variety of material and nonmaterial inequalities and hierarchies – such as those related to class, gender, “race,” caste, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, education, age, or health – that have affected women’s lives in and across all parts of the world and in different historical periods.
    2. Unequal Sisters: Women, Gender, and Global Inequalities in Historical Perspective (2)
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      We are looking for papers that deal with a variety of material and nonmaterial inequalities and hierarchies that have affected women’s lives in and across all parts of the world and in different historical periods. We also hope to explore the many ways in which women have challenged or fought these inequalities and hierarchies, i.e., through different kinds of politics and activism, as well as individual actions and forms of resistance in the so-called “private sphere.”
    3. Unequal Sisters: Women, Gender, and Global Inequalities in Historical Perspective (3)
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      The aim of this session is to focus on and further explore women’s history from a global and non-Western perspective. We welcome papers that rethink relations and interconnections between women and women’s organizations in different regions and parts of the world and encourage panels with an international composition that explore topics, concepts, historical events, and/or the role of organizations and individuals from a variety of locations and perspectives.
  18. International Social History Association
    1. Issues and Debates in Social History (I)
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      Will follow
    2. Issues and Debates in Social History (II)
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      Will follow
    3. Issues and Themes in Social History (III)
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      Will follow
  19. International Standing Conference for the History of Education
    1. Discoveries of childhood in History (opening session,Thu afternoon 26th )
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      Discovering childhood: through that ‘eureka’- experience passed various people in the course of history. From religious moralists to educational practitioners, from scientific pedagogues to philosophers, from poets to painters and other artists, from lawmakers to children’s rights adherents, not to forget generations of parents: all discovered childhood. Indeed, people have discovered childhood many times in history, and from various angles, both inside and outside science. For those who passed through that ‘eureka’-moment, the discovery of childhood being the centre of the universe, or at least of the educational universe, would determine their future educational thinking and acting. As a result, this long-term phenomenon in the history of education shaped a major part of educational theory and practice.
      Participants at theses three sessions will explore discoveries of childhood in history from those multiple points of view and from those multiple practices.
    2. Discoveries of childhood in History - subthemes (Friday morning 27th)
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      Discovering childhood: through that ‘eureka’- experience passed various people in the course of history. From religious moralists to educational practitioners, from scientific pedagogues to philosophers, from poets to painters and other artists, from lawmakers to children’s rights adherents, not to forget generations of parents: all discovered childhood. Indeed, people have discovered childhood many times in history, and from various angles, both inside and outside science. For those who passed through that ‘eureka’-moment, the discovery of childhood being the centre of the universe, or at least of the educational universe, would determine their future educational thinking and acting. As a result, this long-term phenomenon in the history of education shaped a major part of educational theory and practice.
      Participants at this conference will explore discoveries of childhood in history from those multiple points of view and from those multiple practices.
      Subtheme 1: Child focused space: from learning environments to playgrounds and amusement parks. 2: The development of children’s rights and the interest of the child. 3: Child focused child science: behavioural, medical, juridical. 4: Child focused concepts and practices on childhood disabilities. 5: Child focused economic and advertisement culture. 6: The historiography of the discovery of childhood.
    3. Discoveries of childhood in History (closing session, Friday afternoon 27th)
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      Concluding session:
      Discovering childhood: through that ‘eureka’- experience passed various people in the course of history. From religious moralists to educational practitioners, from scientific pedagogues to philosophers, from poets to painters and other artists, from lawmakers to children’s rights adherents, not to forget generations of parents: all discovered childhood. Indeed, people have discovered childhood many times in history, and from various angles, both inside and outside science. For those who passed through that ‘eureka’-moment, the discovery of childhood being the centre of the universe, or at least of the educational universe, would determine their future educational thinking and acting. As a result, this long-term phenomenon in the history of education shaped a major part of educational theory and practice.
  20. Société Internationale pour la Didactique de l’Histoire
    1. Historical Consciousness and Cultural Identities in a Globalizing World: Changing Roles of School History? (Registration for this session is closed)
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      Governments in America, Asia, Australia and Europe show an increasing attention for school history, patrimonial heritage, public history and other forms of popular historical culture. In the face of a globalizing world, with multinational corporations, the internet, enhanced mobility, and the arrival of large numbers of immigrants, many governments tend to pursue the strengthening of national identity by demanding assimilation. One important strategy for fostering social cohesion and the integration of minorities is the transmission of a coherent national past to younger generations. The political use of history education, public commemoration, and other articulations of the past reduce the development of historical consciousness to a political ideology, discouraging dissenting voices and hampering complex representations. What does this mean for those involved in history education for young people: school teachers, museum curators, and heritage educationalists?
      This session will address theoretical issues as well as present outcomes of empirical research. Central questions are:
      • What forms of historical consciousness arise in societies characterized by a wealth of intercultural contacts resulting from increasing mobility and communication technologies?
      • What are opportunities and limitations for critical response from historians and history teachers to the identity demands coming from national states, ethnic groups and social cultural agencies? What are curriculum current practices produced by officials, teachers and public historians in addressing these issues?

    2. The present as challenge to the teaching of history
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      This session deals with the complex relationship between past and present in the context of history education. The tension will be explored between the idea that the essence of historical thinking is to learn to detach oneself from the present and to be open to the otherness of the past (and, hence, to consider presentism as a trap to be avoided), and, on the other hand, pertinent societal expectations towards history education as an introduction into contemporary society. Both positions will, secondly, be contrasted with a third approach which stresses the importance for students to learn to understand the contemporary character of any (public or private, past or present) representation of the past, and which incites at explicitly integrating the complex relationship between the past and the present in the history curriculum.
    3. School History facing Controversial Memories.
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      There are a lot of students from different countries and cultures with their own memories. How can the teaching of history cope with?
  21. Société pour l’étude des Croisades et de l’Orient latin / Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East (SSCLE)
    1. Acre and its Falls: 1104, 1187, 1191 and 1291 I
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      Of all the cities of the Latin East Acre is the one which changed hands by violence most often. Its capture in 1104 is generally referred to fairly briefly, and indeed comparatively little attention has been paid to its importance in the 12th century. The city fell quickly to Saladin after Hattin in 1187, in contrast to Tyre to the north which held out stubbornly and ultimately formed the base for the attempted reconquest of the kingdom in the Third Crusade. But it is the siege of Acre from 1189 to 1191 which has naturally attracted much attention. The successful outcome allowed the continuation of the kingdom down to 1291 when Acre became the chief and indeed almost only city of the Latin State. This city and its structure is now familiar to us because of intense recent archaeological investigation. In this session the 'Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East' is seeking to understand the importance of Acre and its role in crusading history over a period of nearly 200 years.
    2. Acre and its Falls: 1104, 1187, 1191 and 1291 II
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      Of all the cities of the Latin East Acre is the one which changed hands by violence most often. Its capture in 1104 is generally referred to fairly briefly, and indeed comparatively little attention has been paid to its importance in the 12th century. The city fell quickly to Saladin after Hattin in 1187, in contrast to Tyre to the north which held out stubbornly and ultimately formed the base for the attempted reconquest of the kingdom in the Third Crusade. But it is the siege of Acre from 1189 to 1191 which has naturally attracted much attention. The successful outcome allowed the continuation of the kingdom down to 1291 when Acre became the chief and indeed almost only city of the Latin State. This city and its structure is now familiar to us because of intense recent archaeological investigation. In this session the 'Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East' is seeking to understand the importance of Acre and its role in crusading history over a period of nearly 200 years.
    3. Acre and its Falls: 1104, 1187, 1191 and 1291 III
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      Of all the cities of the Latin East Acre is the one which changed hands by violence most often. Its capture in 1104 is generally referred to fairly briefly, and indeed comparatively little attention has been paid to its importance in the 12th century. The city fell quickly to Saladin after Hattin in 1187, in contrast to Tyre to the north which held out stubbornly and ultimately formed the base for the attempted reconquest of the kingdom in the Third Crusade. But it is the siege of Acre from 1189 to 1191 which has naturally attracted much attention. The successful outcome allowed the continuation of the kingdom down to 1291 when Acre became the chief and indeed almost only city of the Latin State. This city and its structure is now familiar to us because of intense recent archaeological investigation. In this session the 'Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East' is seeking to understand the importance of Acre and its role in crusading history over a period of nearly 200 years.
  22. Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP)
    1. The material book and the historical disciplines: convergences and conflicts
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      The history of the book is an interdisciplinary academic practice in which historians have worked closely with literary scholars, students of communication and bibliographers. In this session the relationship of "book history" to the central concerns of contemporary historioal practice will be probed.

Internal commissions

  1. Comité International pour la Métrologie Historique
    1. Packages, weights and measures from the ancient forms of transportation up to the "container era"
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      The session is intended to highlight problems concerning the aggregation of numerical data obtained from pre-modern official documents that used non-standardized measures of weight and capacity. Pre-modern economic activity – such as overseas or domestic trade and production – was most likely to be recorded by government officials when taxed. Customs duties were levied in sea ports on foreign imports and exports. Other branches of domestic economic activity were tapped by levying excise duties on production branches such as brewing, leather making, textiles, or certain service sector activities (for instance amounts collected at the city gates at times of fairs and markets). With the exception of a few pre-modern states – most prominently seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Britain – the records preserved, however, do not normally or always use standardized measures of weight and capacity. Very often this impedes the production of reliable ex post aggregations of goods’ flows and commodity stocks. Thus one of the main aims of this session is to discuss possible ways out of this historical trap. Is it possible for instance to find common and reliable multipliers for “sacks of wool”, “bags of cotton”, "barrels of fish, butter” and the like that may be used to construct time series of economic activity, such as a run of years stating imports into a certain port etc.?

      A second major goal of the session – resulting in part from the first one – would be to conceptualize, perhaps formalize, a new history of the standardized container from Antiquity to the Modern Age. Ever since the barrel replaced the amphora as a standard measure of capacity for liquid and dry goods alike, several innovations occurred in pre-modern trade that reduced transaction costs and the costs of transporting goods from point a to point b, thus helping to integrate larger parts of the world, reduce prices and perhaps increase markets and consumption levels. What role did new packages play in the commercial or economic development of a particular area? In which ways were weights and measures adjusted to the changing needs of trade and economic activity?

      The session organizers invite papers on any aspect relating to the above, as well as other topics of interest in relation to the main goals sketched out in the present proposal.

  2. Commission Internationale de Diplomatique
    1. Charters in Medieval Society
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      The session focusses on the role of charters in daily life as well as in lawsuits, economy etc., and will take a special interest in the role of ritual.
  3. International Commission for the History of Russian Revolution
    1. Business meeting 1
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      Business meeting morning session
    2. Business meeting 2
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      Business meeting afternoon session